Tuesday, 20 September 2016

How do you respond when your child falls?

Kate's teacher related an incident at school, and commented that she is very brave.

She had accidentally dropped a toy on her toe and it bled.

She winced but did not burst into tears.

Her teacher noticed that whenever she falls, she would just pick herself up, and asked me if that was because she was the 6th child. Tough and resilient.

I think how a child reacts has a lot to do with the way the adults respond.

Kate was a few months old when our helper, Mary, came. Every time she fell, I don't know who shrieked louder. The child or the helper. Sometimes, Mary's loud scream scared her even more than the fall itself. Mary would run over, pick her up and sayang (pacify) her effusively.

I told her not to do that as her response only served to make her cry even louder so that she will be showered with more attention.
Tripped and fell
Thinking back, my mum had an even more ridiculous response when the kids fell and cried.

Once, one of the older kids knocked her head against the side of the table and cried uncontrollably.

When all soothing words failed, my mum tried to distract her by hitting the table loudly saying, "Naughty table! You hurt my little girl." Grandma and toddler ended up hitting the table repeatedly together, scolding it for her mishap.

As that response worked to stop the child from crying, my mum would do that whenever any of them fell and cried. Be it the floor that was naughty, the door, or some poor innocent toy. I can still picture in my mind's eye many a ridiculous scene with grandma and toddler admonishing some inanimate object.

With Kate, I have stopped my mum from doing that and explained that it will teach her to adopt a blaming or victim mentality. I got hurt, it's your fault. Always somebody else's fault.

The hubs, on the other hand, has his own method of dealing with it. He would try to console them for say, 10 seconds, but if they continue to sob, his patience would run out.

"That's enough. You're a big girl/boy. Stop crying. It's just a little cut." And that was that. They would have to get on with it, no matter how much it hurt.

It might stem their crying quite quickly, but it is not very healthy for them emotionally as they will bottle everything inside.

My teens and I were having a good laugh recently when they read something off social media.

When a child falls, the caucasian mum will go, "Honey are you alright?" Followed by hugs and kisses.

A Singaporean mum would scream, "Run la! Run some more!" (rub it in, shall we!)

I've had a lot of practice dealing with their scrapes and scratches, and with Kate, I'm now as cool as a cucumber.

She was running in the mall and fell face forward on the ground. The s-p-l-a-t kind of fall. The adults around her gasped and waited for the wail to follow and the rush of hands to grab her up.

Silence.

For 3 seconds, no one moved.

Kate looked at me, and I gave her my yes, I know you can pick yourself up look.

She got up, dusted herself and came to me for a big hug.

I asked her quietly "Does it hurt?" She nodded, and because her hurt was acknowledged, she didn't need to cry loudly to make it known. "Where is the pain?" She pointed to the few places where she hit the ground.

I kissed her to make it better and she was as good as new.

The adults looked at me and smiled. Seriously. They stood there and watched the whole 'show'.

I guess the bigger lesson for them to learn is that even if in future, they fail or fall, they will be able to pick themselves up.

~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Tuesday, 13 September 2016

When mummy goes to work...

Now that I work most Saturdays, my mum has happily assumed her weekly grandmotherly role of seeing to their lunch and taking them on errand runs.

She checked with me if it was alright to take #4 to get her ears pierced as it had closed a few years ago and they were discussing it recently.

Apparently, the older girls were having an intimate chat with grandma about the distribution of heirlooms.

After I gave my mum the go ahead, she casually asked if it was ok to let Kate pierce her ears if she wanted the same as her sister, as Kate usually tags along where the action is.

That hasn't crossed my mind as the rest of the girls had theirs done in primary school when they were more aware and asked for it themselves.

I was hesitant but my mum pressed on. "You had your ears pierced when you were 4 and Kate is almost 4, so I don't see a problem."

It was one of those conversations where there wasn't a definite conclusion, but I remember telling my mum that in the event that Kate really wanted her ears pierced, they had to let her know what it entailed.

I went off to work and didn't think much about it.

Mid afternoon, I received a text from #2.

Mum! Kate had her ears pierced!!
shiny like a princess
I had the story related to me when I stepped into the house.

Apparently, when they reached the shop, my mum asked Kate if she wanted to have earrings, and being in the phase of wanting to be adorned with sparkly ornaments like a princess, she said yes!!

I would have thought my mum would let the older sibling go first, but obviously, she had an agenda.

Once Kate agreed, she plonked her on the hot seat.

#4 started getting worried and asked her por por, "Are you sure we should be doing this? We need to ask mummy first."

To which my mum confidently answered, "Your mummy has already agreed."

Punch. Kate cried. Like really, really, loudly. That grandpa had to walk away as his poor heart couldn't take her heart wrenching sobs.

And up till that point when I reached home, she did not want anyone to touch any part of her face. Or shoulders. Or even her hair, for fear of it getting entangled with her earrings.

Perfect. Just as I had expected.

After the girls were done relating the whole story, my mum calmly reminded me that I had to clean her ear lobes properly with the antiseptic lotion every morning and night, lest it became affected.

That night, she screamed as I tried to wriggle the cotton bud soaked with stinging antiseptic lotion on her earlobes.

The next morning, she tried in vain to ward me off as I brandished the bottle and cotton bud.

As you can imagine, it became a daily nightmare. Both for her and for me. I really didn't need this.

On the 4th night, Kate was playing with #3 after dinner and when I told her to get ready to shower and prepare for bedtime, she asked if she could shower and sleep with #3.

I was about to say no, but had a much better idea!

I allowed it, and told #3 to clean her earlobes after she showered.

"Sure mum, I will."

I braced myself to hear her cries.

Lo and behold, there was none!

The next night, when I brandished the cotton wool, Kate started crying and screaming. I couldn't make out what she was trying to tell me.

Finally, when she calmed down enough to speak audibly, I heard her desperately yell, "Just drip. Just DRIP!"

"Just drip? Is that what you said?"

"Yes! I said JUST DRIP!"

I tilted her head and dripped the lotion onto her earrings.

"I told you. Just drip!"

"Who taught you that?"

"Jie jie."

I should just relinquish some of my duties to my teens.

Friday came around quickly enough and #3 reminded me that they had to return to the shop for a follow-up the next day.

I called my mum to pass on the reminder to take them for their earlobe check up, and for the first time, I was happy to escape to work.

I wonder what surprises will await me week after week...

~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Friday, 2 September 2016

What makes a good Teacher?

Despite my crazy schedule, teachers' day is always a significant event in our yearly calendar, and I make time to mark this day. Teachers are such a big part of my children's lives, and besides the heartfelt words of thanks throughout the year, this is one day we can formally show our appreciation to these very special people.

The flurry of activity started the day before in our kitchen as #3 and her bff spent the whole afternoon making cake pops. This year, I decided to use a fairly simple chocolate chip recipe to bake cookies for Kate's teachers so that she could do most of the steps with minimal assistance from me.

It was dinnertime by the time the last batch of cookies were done and she packed them into little boxes and used her name stickers to seal them. All set!

In the morning, I taught her to hand the boxes to each of her teachers and she giggled and gave them hugs while wishing them.
I can bake!
After depositing her in school, the hubs and I prepared to go over to #2's school as she was performing a solo item! Unfortunately, before her act, the hubs had to rush off to pick Kate up. That's how it's like when you have too many kids.

We were extremely proud of her for the courage to want to go up on stage to sing on teachers' day. It wouldn't have been possible if the teacher in charge did not back them up, allow them this opportunity, and give them words of encouragement as their nerves took over.

Despite the hurdles of not having rooms approved for her, the pianist and the drummer to practice together, and of being in the middle of prelims, they pressed on and did a good show to wild screams from their peers.

It didn't matter that the singing wasn't spectacular, but such spirit! One seemingly small step of a student going up on stage to sing. But the message was strong. Nothing is impossible. Dare to dream. Have the strength to persevere. I'm sure they will remember this for a long time to come.

And who knows? Many may have been inspired to step out of their comfort zone and rise up to challenges as they leave this school and embark on the next phase of their lives.

As part of the parents' support group, we were invited to the teachers' day celebrations where we showed our appreciation on behalf of all the parents by handing over the gifts we made, and thanking the teachers for their hard work.

Together, we prayed a beautiful prayer for teachers,

(Teachers:)
May our gift of teaching;
Awaken minds to new ideas, and expand hearts beyond boundaries.

May our love of learning;
Lead students to awe and wonder at their participation in our sacred universe.

May our story-telling inspire imagination and creativity;
And our example lead those we teach to be generous and noble.

(Parents:)
May your desire to educate;
Evoke the unique gifts of each student, and the deep desires of each heart

And, as you bless your students on their way;
May you delight at the gift your life offers to the future.

What struck us mummies was that teachers' day celebrations in school are a far cry from what we had in our day.

Students from the media CCA groups came up with video montages and the young teachers gamely posed, danced and lip-synced to the delight of their students.

They also had a fun segment where awards were given out to teachers amidst much cheering, and it was heartwarming to see the camaraderie between the teachers, students, Principal and VPs.

We had a late lunch with their friends before coming back to the other kids.

#4 related an oral practice session they had in class and the topic was "What makes a good teacher?"

Given how much I had been hearing about their teachers piling them with homework prior to the PSLE countdown, I half expected things like, "A good teacher is someone who doesn't scold us" or "Someone who gives us less homework."

However, I was surprised how matured these 12-year olds were.

These were the top 8 traits they listed, ranked in order.

1. Someone who is patient.

2. Someone with the ability to make lessons interesting.

3. Someone who is understanding.

4. Someone who is fair to all.

5. Someone who is approachable.

6. Someone who is helpful.

7. Someone who is kind.

8. (She couldn't recall what the eighth trait was).

My faith has been renewed in children! We tend to think of children collectively as being from a spoilt, 'me-first' generation.

It probably takes a saint to have all of those traits all of the time!

To all teachers, we wish you a very Happy Teachers' Day! Enjoy the long weekend with your family and loved ones. We appreciate the good work that you do, day in day out.

And now that I run an enrichment centre, I have a team of teachers!

Let us never forget the why behind what we are doing, and besides enjoying teaching the easy and teachable kids, when the going gets tough, when the children are challenging, may we remember that it is a calling to be an educator, a responsibility as much as a privilege that we must never take lightly.

And not only is it the job of educators, but we parents are our children's first teachers. I leave you with this prayer, which we ended the teachers' day celebration with:


Enable me to teach with wisdom for I help to shape the mind.
Equip me to teach with truth for I help to shape the conscience.
Encourage me to teach with vision for I help to shape the future.
Empower me to teach with love for I help to shape the world.

HAPPY TEACHERS' DAY!


~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Wednesday, 17 August 2016

Walking with God as a Christian Parent - my Interview

I am extremely humbled to have been interviewed by Dr Phillip Towndrow for his new book, Walking with God as a Christian Parent - Developing wisdom for the 21st century.

As Rev Ezekiel Tan puts it, "Raising a child today is more challenging than ever before, with an unprecedented range of influences and experiences making an impact on parenting decisions."

It is indeed not easy for parents to navigate the complex landscape our children are growing up in and with each of my 6 children, I am constantly learning something new.

At the heart of the book are 8 personal sharings of how God has worked in the lives of these parents, with lots of wisdom to be found.

Dr Towndrow expertly extracts the pertinent points, guiding readers to avail themselves of the insights and practical advice.
Walking with God as a Christian Parent
The 8 chapters include: Intentionally Passing on the Faith, Sowing Seeds Building Foundations, Sharing the Treasure I have Found, The Parenting Project, The importance of Presence, I cannot Fail, Discipline and Parenting, and my chapter is titled - Walking with God.

Here's an excerpt:

Michelle also has a deep grounding in God's divine provision. She explains her personal circumstances in simple yet impactful terms:

Even when it comes to my children and the schools they wanted to get into, my friends would ask, "Hey, what are your plans?" Everybody had plans. They would either send their kids to all kinds of tuition to get the necessary grades or they had other plans through sports or the arts.

I had no plans. I had total faith in God's provision of what was best for them. To me, kids should be kids. My third daughter just went into Secondary school this year. In the end, to everyone's amazement, she got in through DSA (Direct School Admission) in a sport she's never played in her life.


I remember the day we went to church and I prayed so hard. It was funny. I prayed for two things. To get into her sister's school, or a mission school. I wanted her to be involved in a sport that I didn't have to pay for. And she told me, if the appeal was granted after school had started, she didn't want to transfer. Within a few days our prayers were answered perfectly, just before school commenced.


And that's how I live. I know that things will be fine. If there's anything I need to discern, I simply go to the adoration room in church and pray about it, with all my heart and all my soul, and I will get my answer, either through people, through the psalms in Church with touch me deeply, or other signs. When my last child started preschool, I wanted to do some meaningful work. I had so many criteria - flexible timing, minimal work during the school holidays, working with passionate people in an area I was interested in. It seemed a long shot, as I had not worked much in the past 15 years. I prayed about it, and the most perfect opportunity came about, with all my criteria met!


I like how Dr Towndrow concludes each chapter with succinct summary points and discussion questions for us to ponder about.

One such example is this question: "How do you discipline your children? Do you make a distinction between discipline and love? Explain your answer."

I can see how this book would also be useful in small group discussion sessions.
Armour Publishing
I have been enriched by reading Dr Towndrow's new book and I'm sure you will be too.

I'll be happy to personally give away one copy to a lucky reader, please leave your details over at our Facebook page. Emails can be privately sent to mummyweedotcom@gmail.com.

Walking with God as a Christian Parenting is retailing at major bookstores @ $18.19. You can also purchase it online from Armour Publishing at a special web price of $15.46.

Wishing all a fulfilling parenting journey. Do your best and let God do the rest!


~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Wednesday, 3 August 2016

Kate's been having a rough time

For the past 2 weeks, Kate has been crying every morning when I drop her off at school.

It started because of a change of routine, as some days I could not pick her up after school when I was still at work.

It did not help that the first time the hubs had to pick her, he completely forgot about it! By the time he reached her school, he was half an hour late.

To a little child, 30 minutes feels like an eternity.

She later told me that she was afraid daddy had forgotten about her and left her in school. Besides, she was very, very hungry.

From that day on, she kept saying she didn't want to go to school anymore and would cry upon arriving at school.

We kept trying to talk her out of her fears and reason with her, to no avail.

After trying to problem solve for 2 weeks, I found out that she has 2 trigger points.
Poor lil Kate
The first is that she does not take to change well.

Her teachers explained that in children around 3 years of age, their sense of order is quite strong. More so in some children, and less in others. For Kate, she has a very strong need for order and her teachers mentioned how on Fridays, she gets out of sorts because they have music and outdoor play, which throws her out of whack.

Her teacher managed to solve this problem by giving her ample time for transition and to pre-empt her before a change in activity.

Thus the fact that it was a different person picking her up everyday, either myself, the hubs, or one of my sisters-in-law, made her anxious.

Her teacher said that like clockwork, at the start of their dismissal routine, she would suddenly burst into tears.

I solved the problem by letting her know the night before who was going to pick her up the next day. Initially, when she asked me in the morning, "Mummy, are you going to pick me later?" I would say yes, or I'll try. I didn't know what was behind that question, and that a vague answer made her more anxious.

I also asked whoever was picking her to be there 10 minutes early, so that once she started craning her neck to see if someone was going to be at the school gate, she would spot one of us before the fear seized her.

We did this for a week to reassure her and this stemmed her dismissal meltdown.

Secondly, I discovered that she is very sensitive to tone of voice.

Every time she cried, her teachers would try to gently talk her out of it. When that did not work, they must have talked to her in a firmer tone, and sometimes they got her to sit in the thinking chair in a corner so that she did not disturb the other children while she cooled down.

I'm quite certain that none of her teachers have really scolded her, but to her, even a raised tone is considered to be a "scolding".

It reached a point where I was asking her to do something and she replied, "Ok, I will do it, but can you ask Ms C not to scold me anymore?" When she responded that way the whole weekend, I knew something was wrong.

She was so fearful of her teacher!

After many, many little talks, she mentioned that she likes one of the new teachers, a soft-spoken, gentle lady.

I spoke to her teachers and they were very understanding, and stopped putting her on the thinking chair.

Whenever she started crying, the new teacher would sit with her and speak to her quietly.

Thankfully, that 2-week crying episode is over.

Even after 6 kids, I am learning something new every time.

I'm just glad I managed to resolve her worries and learnt more about her in the process.


~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~







Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Sandbank - International Lunch Buffet on Weekdays

We were invited to the recent launch of Sandbank's new Weekday Lunch Buffet. 

A leisurely meal by the seaside was something I wasn't about to turn down and decided to take my staff along for a lovely lunch treat.

This launch follows the great success of Sandbank's Weekend Breakfast buffet which my kids enjoyed very much the last time we were here.
Mixed Grill
I started with their selection of grilled meats and vegetables, and had some fresh salad to go with it.

The rest of the spread reminded me of a delicious home-cooked meal, which was a nice change from the usual buffet offerings.
Pork ribs
Deep fried fish fillet with soyabean sauce
Clams in wine
Tandoori Chicken
My favourite had to be the grilled lamb. Very succulent.
Grilled lamb
If my kids had joined us, they would have loved the pasta station, pizza and fried food section.
Pizza
Chicken wings, calamari rings, spring roll
We ended our meal with some fruits and desserts. Tea and coffee are also included in the buffet.
Dessert
Being a weekday, we got to enjoy the laidback East coast park ambience without the crowds.
Parkland Green @ ECP
It was a nice change to come out for a lovely lunch together with my teachers and this is a great place for simple team-bonding sessions.
My newly adopted 'family'
Sandbank's International Lunch Buffet is available Tuesdays to Fridays (excluding PH) from 11.30am - 3.30pm.

{GIVEAWAY} I am delighted to be giving away a {Weekday International Lunch Buffet for 4 PAX} at Sandbank at East Coast Park to ONE lucky winner!

All you have to do is:
  • Like Mummy Wee's Facebook page
  • Like this post on Facebook
  •  Leave a comment on Mummy Wee's Facebook post stating your name, email address and tell us what is your favourite food for lunch on weekdays (You can also leave your email privately at mummyweedotcom@gmail.com)
Details:
  • 1 lucky winner will be chosen at random
  • Open to Singapore residents only
  • Ends midnight of 31 July 2016
  • Winners will be announced @ mummyweeblog on 4 August 2016
  • Winners will be contacted by our sponsor.
Good luck!
920 East Coast Parkway
#01-28
Parkland Green
Singapore 449875
Tel: 62477988

Opening hours:
Tue/Wed/Thur: 11.30am - 11pm
Fri/Eve of PH: 11.30am - 12mn
Sat/ PH: 8.30am - 12mn
Sun: 8.30am - 11pm

Disclaimer: We were invited to the launch of Sandbank's International Lunch Buffet. All opinions are my own.

~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Wednesday, 20 July 2016

Get into the PSLE fray? Not me.

There has been a flood of reactions, opinions and questions from parents since MOE released their new grading system last Wednesday.

Many acknowledge that doing away with the fine differentiation is a step in the right direction but wonder if it will help to reduce stress levels in our children.

Some feel it might get more stressful.

One thing is for sure.

There is no perfect system and it is hard to please every parent.

As for me, I will do no different with Kate than I have done with my 5 other kids.

In fact, it is good news for us because now the choice of school has more weightage than before. It will be taken into consideration not just once, but twice, in the event of a tie.

If Kate so happens to be tied with a few other students fighting for the last place in a particular school, they will look at choice order before putting them in the ballot box.

Although I doubt she will be in that situation because for her first choice, I will likely select a school with an entry point which she can comfortably get into.

I have learnt to look further as there is the issue of streaming at the end of secondary 2.

I made that mistake with #1, where she scrapped in to the school of her choice.

During streaming, she was near the bottom of her cohort and did not manage to choose the subjects she was strong in, which affected her O level grades.

I am waiting for MOE to roll out more information over the next few years to illustrate every single school's specialised programme and shortlist those within close proximity of our house.

With more details, we parents can make an informed decision to match the interest and learning needs of our children to the distinctive programmes the schools are offering.
Where's your ladder leading to?
MOE can come up with new grading systems and new criteria, but if mindsets do not change, nothing much will change, and our education system will be as stressful as ever.

Before we pour all our resources in the race to the top, have we thought long and hard about whether this is the best ladder to climb?

The worst thing is to reach the top only to wonder if it has been the right ladder all along.

How I have managed to remain calm and not get sucked into the academic frenzy these past 12 years is to look at things from a broader perspective.

Yes, the PSLE is a big exam.

A bigger question I constantly ask myself is, do I need to look past the PSLE?

What are we preparing our kids for?

I don't know about you, but I am preparing my kids for a future which I cannot foresee.

Hence, I am trying to guide them to be adaptable and unafraid to face challenges.

To be able to think and communicate their ideas.

To see mistakes as learning opportunities and be able to pick themselves up when they fail.

To ensure that they are future-ready, they need to be good problem-solvers, analytical thinkers, with strong interpersonal skills.

I have been trying to build these skills and traits in them from the time they were young through the way I parent and the opportunities I find along the way. However, I have not been able to find a systematic way to do it.

When I met this speech pathologist and discovered how her team of education specialist has been working with children quietly but doggedly over the past decade, I knew that this was the missing piece of the puzzle.

Since I haven't been able to find a solution to address this need, the next best thing was to come up with a solution!

We have spent the past year working on this new initiative to ensure that the successes she has seen with individual children can be replicated in a group enrichment setting.

It was really interesting how during one of our training sessions, my ex-MOE teacher was sharing that when she spoke to her group of teacher friends about our curriculum, the secondary school teachers assumed that the primary school teachers were teaching such skills while the primary school teachers felt that they already had too much content to teach, and expected (or hoped) that most of their students came with such skills intact.

Therein lies a huge gap we have unearthed.

There is a whole set of skills which are expected of children in a classroom setting, such as being able to pay attention and focus, listening to instructions, planning, prioritising and initiating tasks, displaying impulse control, besides having higher order thinking skills such as visualisation, sequential organization, inference and deduction, perception and memory recall. And the list goes on. 

However, these cognitive skills are not explicitly developed in children and parents only start to see the problems when they enter formal education.

I believe that by giving Kate a solid foundation in acquiring these fundamental executive functioning skills, and equipping her with the right mindset and learning habits, it will set her up for successes in future, whichever path she might choose to pursue.

I am really excited to observe for myself the impact of this programme on Kate and how it might shape her learning in a positive way.
A happy learning environment
Kids these days are shunted from school to tuition and learning has lost its meaning.

Children should never lose their love of learning and we make an effort to design our classes to be fun because kids learn best through play, and there is always laughter to be heard around here.

It will be a long yet enriching journey ahead as we guide parents towards this very new concept. In some children, the change may be quite apparent but in others, nothing may seem to be surfacing even though a lot of learning is taking place.

Every child we see transformed, even in small ways, gives us great joy and satisfaction.

As a team, this is what continues to inspire and motivate us in this journey of impacting the next generation of children.

Our next Open House is on 6 August 2016, for N2 to P1 children. Do book a slot for a trial class and come along to find out more about what we are doing.

We will be running 4 sessions at 9.15am, 11.30am, 2pm and 4pm.

More details can be found over at The Little Executive's Facebook page while we are getting our website ready.

Email us at knockknock@thelittleexecutive.asia with your child's name, age, your contact number and preferred time slot (I'm sure you can guess who came up with that email address).


The Little Executive
144 Bukit Timah Road
Singapore 229844
Tel: 69081889



~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Wednesday, 13 July 2016

NEW Changes to PSLE Scoring and Secondary One Posting

The wait is finally over!

MOE has just released more details of the changes which are going to take place, starting from the 2021 cohort.

In a bid to reduce the excessive focus on academic result due to the fine differentiation of students by aggregate points, they are changing to a grade band.

Since our PM announced this change almost 3 years ago, parents have voiced tremendous disapproval at this suggestion, speculating what sort of criteria would be used as the tie-breaker when there are students with the same grades, for example 4 As or 4 Bs.

Here's where MOE is going to make the biggest change. They are introducing 8 Achievement Levels (ALs), with AL 1 being the best.

This is similar to the O Level grading system, just that the mark range is different.

See table below for mark range.

Credit: MOE press release
The PSLE Score is the sum of ALS across the four subjects, ranging from 4 to 32, with a score of 4 being the best.

Students with a score of 4 - 20 will be streamed into the Express course.

See table above for the placement outcomes of Express, N(A) and N(T) and their corresponding PSLE scores.

The other significant change is that previously, when there were students having the exact same PSLE score fighting for the last place in a school, they would be allocated to the secondary school based on a computerised balloting.

Many parents were not privy to this, but yes, for the few students in this situation, it was down to luck.

In future, choice order would be the new tie-breaker.

What this means is that, say for example there are 3 students fighting for the last place in a particular school.

Student A puts it as his 1st choice, Student B puts it as his 2nd choice, and Student C puts it as his 3rd choice.

In this scenario, Student A would be given priority for the spot.

With this wider scoring bands as compared to aggregate points, we will see a higher percentage of students who will end up in this situation.

Thus, more than ever, we have to use our 6 choices judiciously.

This is a lot to digest for now.

This new scoring system looks to be the middle ground between the aggregate score (which is too fine) and grade bands of A,B,C,D (which is too broad).

The way I see it, this seems to be the most practical solution to move towards their goals of reducing an over-emphasis on chasing the last mark and hopefully free up time and space for a more holistic education and well-rounded family life.

More details can be found at: https://www.moe.gov.sg/psle



~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~







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