Saturday, 14 January 2017

Are we slowly killing ourselves?

We are just into the second week of January and I need a break. A vacation. The kind where you don't bring the kids so you can chill at a secluded beach, let the sound of the waves wash over you, and let your mind wander.

It's been a pretty full-on week. On top of working full-time, I squeezed in a JC Open House, charity event, orthodontic visit, church group discussion and met up with friends over dinner. And then there's the weekend with a meet-the-principal session, University open house, two birthday parties and a dinner. All while juggling the kids.

We are trying to fit too much into our lives, aren't we?

I was telling some mums who were concerned about their kids being over-scheduled that they are like sponges. There is only so much they can absorb and everything else will spill over.

It is no different with us. We are rushing from one place to another. Have we stopped to think about our lives? The quality of it? Our connection with others? Our connection with our kids? Are we always barking at them to hurry up? Ferrying them from one activity to another without spending time with them? Do we know what is on their minds and in their hearts?

It's funny how every time someone asks us, "How are you?" Somewhere in our answer will be "Busy lor, with work, kids, and whatever million other things we have on our plate."

Since when has being busy become a badge of honour?

Have we given much thought about how we really are feeling? C'mon, there's so much to do, who has time to stop to think if this is what we really want our lives to be, or if we are deep-down-contented happy.

There are bills to be paid, a household to run. And say, if we did reflect on how our lives are going, do we have the luxury to stop, if we find this is not how we want to live our lives?

#2 has been doing the JC Open house rounds with her schoolmates these past few days. They have 4 days to make a decision and fill in their 12 choices. She invited me to join her to check out her top choice (yes, now mummy can't just barge in to the teenagers' activities).

It was a vibrant scene. The aspirants were eager-faced and excited to join the big new JC world and the seniors and teachers were enthusiastic in answering their questions and encouraging them to join the school.

As I looked around the bustling hall filled with students, parents and teachers, as much as a part of me felt joyous that #2 will be embarking on a pivotal and memorable 2 years of her life where they will study hard, play hard and form solid friendships, I had a nagging feeling.

What have we, as a society, driven ourselves to?

Hearing about how hectic their week is going to be made me wonder if there can be another way.

Seems that for the subject combination she intends to choose, classes will end at 5pm most days, and CCAs are at 5-7pm on 2 days. #1's school was along this bus route, and even though it is 4 bus stops away, during peak hour the buses don't stop if they are full. Thus we expect #2 to be home between 7-8.30pm. Given that they leave the house at 7.30am, that is longer than a working day for adults! Factor in dinner, shower and homework, and it is beyond what a healthy day should look like.

I've heard from many that the weekends are not spared, and they spend it catching up on sleep, revising their work or meeting classmates for group work. My uncles who have been teaching in JCs for the past 30 years concur that times have changed and things have become much tougher than when we were in JC.

It is the same story for #1 who is in poly. She leaves the house at 8am and on days when she has CCA, she is back at 10pm.

This, my dear friends, is our school and work culture. We start over-scheduling our kids when they are in pre-school, the schools take over that job soon enough, and we enter the workforce where it is the norm. Somewhere down the line, we pause and wonder, how did we get here? This is not what I envisioned my life to be.

It is like the speedometer where you rev the car, the pointer is going up up up, and we keep revving, until it reaches the red point. It is no surprise that we have kids attempting suicide. There is only so much a person can take.

Something is seriously wrong. We are advancing so rapidly, but getting nowhere.

What can we do?

How can we slow down?

What can we cut out?

Running at full speed for months on end with only 2 long breaks in a year is hardly sufficient. How can we put more weekly breaks into our schedules so we don't become over-stretched. Both as parents, and for our children.

As parents, we don't even get the break we need (and truly deserve) during the weekends. There are still children to tend to and activities to get done.

I don't have the answers. It is even harder for us with big families as things are multiplied and magnified. The good, the bad, the busy.

All I know is I need to not stop searching for a better way. I hope never to fall into the trap of going with the flow and end up feeling tired, overwhelmed and dejected. Because if we, who are supposed to be the pillars for our children, are ourselves overburdened, how can we support them?

Everyone is running on their own treadmill. In a big family, yes, there are more siblings to share their worries and keep an eye on one another, but there are also more children, more unique personalities and a higher probability of one falling through the cracks. And I only have so many hours in a day, and too many kids who need my attention (although I hear the same cry from parents with only 2 kids!) I do worry.

I guess I'll start with baby steps. Spending time in silence always helps me to recalibrate. I need to be intentional about scheduling that at the end of every week to remove the build up of stress that has accumulated over the week of madness. And I have to engineer the weekends to be rejuvenating, instead of cramming too much in. Some things have to be relinquished.

The big question is, which ones?

You know what comes to mind? The story of the frogs. The one where if you throw a bunch of frogs into a pot of boiling water, they will jump out. But if you put them in water and slowly boil them, they wouldn't know any better as the temperature slowly creeps up on them.

Are we slowly killing ourselves?



Other lessons (which I've learnt the hard way):

Lesson #15: What are we worth, mums?
Lesson #16: What do you do when you get sick of parenting?
Lesson #17: The tragedy of our society


~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Friday, 6 January 2017

Tackling the new school year

We made it! The first week of school has come to an end. What a week it has been. With the exception of #1 who is in the middle of her poly semester, there were lots of changes for the other kids.

We toned our activities down on Sunday and the younger ones were in bed by 8pm. I was all psyched and set my alarm for 5am.

I felt like a chef in a restaurant after watching Ratatouille too many times with the kids, and I'm proud to say I surpassed my own expectations! Managed to whip up a tasty and wholesome meal in 20 minutes and the kids wiped their plates clean and left for school in a jolly mood.
First day of school breakfast
We did not have a harrowing start with bag mix ups and mad bus chase like last year, but things did go downhill from that perfect morning.

With several kids and new routines, that is hardly surprising.

#4 started Sec 1 in a school in our neighbourhood, and she decided to walk home. We have driven past that direction on numerous occasions and she was confident of finding her way home and was unfazed by the 40-minute trek.

However, she got lost!

She was dismissed at 4pm and I had a call half an hour later. I told her to sit and wait at a bus stop and we would come get her after Kate's enrichment class ended.

She waited for more than an hour at the bus stop and needless to say, she was famished and tired. What an end to Day 1 where she was already feeling lost as there was not one student from her previous school and everything was new and strange.

At dinner, the older girls shared their first day of secondary school stories, which included both laughter and tears.

As for little Miss Kate, we had it all planned. We opted for extended day and she would stay in school till 3pm for afternoon activities. That would give me more time to work and I wouldn't need to rush around so much. She herself asked for it as she said she was a 'big girl' and wanted to stay back with her friends.

After the first day, although she did brilliant, she refused to stay back anymore and wanted to revert to the same 12.30pm dismissal as 2016. Perhaps the reality was not what she imagined! Did she envision just hanging around and playing? Possibly.

Sigh, it would have been a perfect arrangement. That one day of having her at school for the whole day spelt freedom! Having time from 9am to 3pm all to myself to work in peace was something I haven't experienced in many, many years.

Alas, she is not ready, and I shall not push her. After all, in the big scheme of things, she barely turned 4, and I will wait patiently and give her space and time to grow more independent. We've managed to squeeze in time for our short daily strolls to unwind and chat, and that is something she looks forward to.
"Pretty flower for you, mummy?"
#2 is awaiting her O level results and it was funny seeing her at home on a school day. Next week! Such exciting times! To see where the next step of her education will take her. She's been such a dear and came down to my centre to help with the cleaning and packing as we prepped for the new year.

#3 has moved up to Sec 3, and has a new set of classmates as they were streamed into the different subject combinations. It's going to be 2 of her most important and memorable years as she and her peers head full swing into preparing for their SYF performance, focusing on their chosen subjects, enjoying their school trips together, and form unbreakable bonds for life.

As for my one and only dear son, it's unbelieveable that he is already in P5. Seeing what #4 went through, I imagine the pace in school to pick up tremendously this year and I have to monitor his progress as well as make sure he is able to cope with the added demands of school.

Now that they are all nicely settled in school, I have time to devote to my work and do what I enjoy.

Speaking to the parents coming through my enrichment centre, I can see the tide turning and in the wake of the recent suicide cases, parents are worried about stressing their kids too much and are searching for a better way.

We are running parenting workshops over a relaxing high-tea session to share tips and ideas on how to help our kids tackle the academic year successfully with less stress. It will be an interactive talk with lots of opportunites to answer your questions.
Parenting Workshop
There are still seats available, grab a friend and come join us! The cost is inclusive of high-tea and workshop materials. Quote "MummyWee" when registering for 10% off!

Date: 11 January (Wed) or 14 January (Sat)
Time: 3-5pm
Venue: Grand Copthorne Waterfront Hotel
Cost: $25
Register: Email knockknock@thelittleexecutive.asia
High Tea @ Grand Copthorne Waterfront
2017, bring it on!

School Stories:

#1 - When your son gets into fights in school
#2 - My son the loan shark
#3 - So kids can't play once they start school?
#11 - How #2 topped her level in English
#12 - DSA. Yet another initiative parents have warped
#13 - Tuition - First line of attack?
#14 - Why do exams have to be so stressful?
#15 - First day mix up!
#16 - The day I forgot to pick my son from school
#17 - No more T-score. Now what?
#18 - Get into the PSLE fray? Not me



~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Saturday, 31 December 2016

Tangerine at RWS

One of my favourite places for lunch is Tangerine at ESPA over at RWS, Sentosa. I love that the food is healthy and light and presented so interestingly. The peaceful ambience always makes me feel like I've stepped away from our crazy life into idyllic bliss, even if for a short 2 hours.
Sous Vide Pork
This is the first time we took the kids there and they enjoyed the lovely afternoon with the adults. They eagerly awaited every dish, as they were so prettily presented. I've come back with new inspiration for their school lunches to jazz up our boring meals!
Asian Bouillabaisse
Asian Bouillabbaisse - Hokkaido Scallop, Seabass, baby kailan. 4 course set menu at $62++ per person.
Scottish Salmon Fillet
Melt-in-your-mouth Salmon fillet, so good that Kate asked for more. We were joking that top on our new year's wish list is to have an in-house gourmet chef so the kids can have healthy meals everyday.
Cod Fish $34
Seared Boneless Beef Short Rib
Chocolate Mousse
Refreshing lemongrass jelly with berries to end the satisfying meal.
Lemongrass Jelly
Their spa cuisine is low on carbohydrates and the growing kids were hungry by teatime! My dear mum enjoyed the place so much she wants to go back for their New Year's menu.
Tangerine
The little herb garden outside was enough to keep Kate occupied and happy while waiting for the food to be served, and she too asked to be back!

Tangerine
ESPA at Resort World Sentosa
Opposite Equarius Hotel
Level 1

Opening hours:
Tuesday - Sunday 11.30am - 10pm
Closed every Monday, except PH
Tel: 6577 6688

~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~


Wednesday, 21 December 2016

Christmas, without the excesses?

I've finally gotten out of bed after being down with a viral fever for almost a week. From running full steam fitting the kids and work into my schedule, to being knocked right to my feet by a tiny unseen bug, it was very frustrating.

Alas, another timely reminder to take care of myself and not neglect my health. And to get enough sleep, on a daily basis!

Feels like I've being given a new lease of life. Can't wait to spring out of bed and start running again. As I drifted in and out of restless slumber, trying to will the throbbing headache and aching bones away, I was conscious there is still so much to be done.

Oh, Christmas is right round the corner and a whole new year begins in 10 days. I'm not ready!

This year, more so after Konmarie-ing my room, I'm torn between being minimalist and keeping to the excesses of the season.

As I was lying in bed mentally counting down the days I had to finish de-cluttering the whole house before 2017, I was thinking of the presents yet to be bought, and really not looking forward to battling the crowds in the malls.
Kids decorating their aunt's tree next door
Besides dealing with Christmas presents, I still have so many items yet to be struck off my ever growing to-do list before the new year dawns, and I'm feeling frantic.

Settling back-to-school matters, the burgeoning pile of home admin paperwork, work admin issues to clear and planning the schedule for next year to fit everything and everyone in.

Amidst all of this, I have to keep reminding myself to take it slow and not get caught up in the meaningless rush of the season, or end up getting snappy at them. I'm more mindful this year, especially because of Kate.

I have discovered that she has an unusual need for routine and ample transition time. We figured it must be very chaotic to be the 6th child in a household where things are happening all the time and with random (to her) people streaming in and out.

So this Christmas, as I try to find time to plan and reflect, I will be mindful to slow down and focus on the important things and remember to be grateful for all that we have. And perhaps, I will be successful in guiding my older girls to understand the real meaning of Christmas, instead of getting caught up in the commercial excesses of the season.

They want the works. I want it simple.

Kate? She doesn't quite care either way. All she needs is mummy and daddy, to be surrounded by people (and dogs) whom she loves and who loves her, and she is one contented kid.

May we experience the true joy of Christmas and bring peace and love to those we meet.

Blessed Christmas.



~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Monday, 12 December 2016

6 ways to squeeze time for the kids as a working mum

This is the first time I am working during the school holidays! I took Kate along with me to our enrichment centre for Dino camp, but she stayed home last week while we ran our P1 Prep camp.

So how do I squeeze in time for her and the other kids during the week? It helps tremendously that I don't have to stick to a 9-5 work week, and depending on the demands of the day, I either get in an hour or two later or leave earlier and resume working at home after they have gone to bed.

1. Start the day early

Even though it is the holidays, Kate and #5 are up by 7.15am. Resisting the urge to sleep in, I think of the hours I'll be away from them and that never fails to get me out of bed. There is nowhere much to take them that early in the morning, hence it's always some park or other.

This little monkey shimmied to the top of the pyramid by herself and called down, "Mum, take a picture of me!" She sure is catching up with the older siblings.
Chilling
2. Kill two (or three) birds with one stone

Instead of rushing to finish breakfast before heading out, we hastily pack a picnic basket with breakfast staples and hop into the car. In that relaxing hour, we get to spend time together, have a proper breakfast and enjoy the benefits of nature.
Xiao Guiling
3. Mobilize the kampung

It really helps that the hubs works from home and instead of rushing back to pick the kids and getting stuck in peak hour traffic, we arrange to meet at the destination and have time to enjoy the outdoors before heading home for dinner.

Sometimes we ask the grandparents to join us, or if the kids end up with friends or aunts, we find somewhere convenient for the kids to play or for a quick dinner together.
Southern ridges
We were trekking through MacRitchie reservoir and Kate was convinced that she found a Dinosaur foot!
MacRitchie reservoir
4. Mummy is there in spirit

When I'm not at home, it doesn't mean that I'm disconnected from them. Kate's obsession this holiday is rollerblading. She loved watching Elsa ice-skate during Disney on Ice and has been asking to go ice-skating every other day. After taking her there 4 times (I'm the one exhausted!) I told her she needs to practice with her rollerblades before I'll consider taking her back.

She was so motivated that she spends 1-2 hours per day on her blades and when I get home, she is ever eager to show me how much she's improved. What a great attitude. Looks like I have to take her ice-skating soon, as promised!

Blade girl
5. Find different ways to be involved

As the kids grow older, they require less and less face-to-face time with you. Any parent of a teenager will tell you that they spend a lot more time in their rooms and communicating with their friends via gadgets. However, this doesn't mean that we stop being involved in their lives.

#3 was lamenting that besides filling her time with clocking the required CIP hours and meeting up with her old friends from primary school, she was bored at home as I am not able to take them out nor go on holidays as #1 is not on term break.

I simply told her to start thinking, and find something gainful to do, make or sell. She started experimenting with home beauty remedies and came up with products to gift her friends, and that led to some orders as well! I encouraged her and told her I was very proud of her efforts.

These days, with technology, we can still stay connected even while we are at work. For teenagers, to be there for them on a daily basis means being able to reply their Whatsapp messages when they need advice or permission to go out with their friends.

Sometimes, it's me who needs advice from them about using technology to make videos or helping me to buy presents online for my staff for Christmas, and that's how we update one another about what is going on in our lives.
Mix n measure
6. Support them daily

Even though I only get to see all my kids during dinner, I keep up-to-date with what they are currently interested in and give them words of encouragement and support.

#2 has just finished her Os and she has the next few months planned out. Last week, she was concentrating on decorating her room as the siblings have just done another round of roommate swopping (yes, it seems to be an annual tradition for them).

She was happily showing me what she has been working on and I was extremely impressed. Instead of spending money on decorations for her room, she decided to make her own. She bought a wooden board ($4 from Art friend), painted it marble, and knocked little nails in it to form the world map.
DIY Wall deco
She painstakingly wound black thread around the nails, ensuring that they were taut, to form the design. Wow. I loved it, and told her so. Sincere words are food for the soul they carry with them through the day, even without the presence of mummy. Sometimes it is encouragement they need, while other times, it may be words of concern and care.
Using nails and thread
To be honest, I was caught off guard at how much easier it was to go to work, be tired, and spend the weekend resting, and not having to deal with the day-to-day demands of the kids at home.

However, I am wary that it is all too easy to let this pattern slip into our norm, as the time we have with our children will never be returned, once lost.


Having these pockets of time to be still, to be present to our surroundings is very grounding for me, no matter how rushed my day is nor how tough things can get sometimes.
Idyllic mornings
Even though these days I'm away between 5-9 hours per day, I'm glad we've managed to work things around this new schedule and am able to spend a reasonable amount of time with the younger kids throughout the week.

I am thankful to have flexible working hours and support from the hubs in caring for them, but whatever your situation may be, try to think out of the box and perhaps you might find opportunities to squeeze time out for your kids during their school holidays.

Related post:

Our June holidays earlier this year where everyone was running at breakneck pace.



~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~ 


Monday, 5 December 2016

Dino Discovery Camp @ The Little Executive

It has been a busy, busy week at my centre with our holiday camps in full swing. Our mini palaeontologists had so much fun learning about dinosaurs while working alongside their new teammates.

We use themes which interest kids to teach a wide range of skills necessary for school such as cognitive flexibility, creating reasonable hypothesis, conditional reasoning, as well as life skills such as problem-solving, being a team player, and having the ability to communicate their ideas well.
Enthusiastic paleontologists
Several kids who enjoyed our previous Astronaut Training Camp joined us again and were delighted to see their ex-camp mates.

The happiest little kid was Kate, who could jump into the car with me in the mornings instead of hearing me say, "Bye, mummy has to go to work now."
Delighted to be in mummy's school
A wide range of sensory activities are carried out in our camps as these naturally encourage children to explore scientific processes, such as making predictions and observations and developing analytical skills. A further benefit is that children retain the most information when they engage their senses in experiential learning.
Squishy squashy mud
In our Dino grid game, the kids were split into 2 teams, and the carnivores had to catch the herbivores. Similar to a chess game, they have to think ahead and strategize so as not to be 'eaten'. They make decisions as a team, directing their player on the grid. We had several frightened little herbivores, afraid to be 'eaten' by the carnivorous dinos!
Strategy game
We go to great lengths to make learning come alive and everything we do in the classroom has a real world example. For example, by examining the size and shape of the footprints, the children were able to deduce which dinosaur it came from.
Field notes
Our mini palaeontologists learned how fossils were formed over millions of years and had a chance to make fossil imprints in 'mud'. This enabled them to understand how real life paaleontologists deduce information based on incomplete evidence.
Fossil imprints
There were lots of hands-on activities to keep them engaged and it was lovely to see some of the kids move from being fearful of getting their hands dirty with sensory work to enjoying the experience with their friends. Kate does plenty of baking at home with me and she gleefully dugged in with both hands to shape her dino eggs.
Hiding dinos in their eggs
And... viola! Some tails were peeking out!
DIY dino eggs
In our speculation exercise "If I lived with the Dinosaurs..." they were guided on deductive reasoning and encouraged to use their imagination. This is a fun way for a child's executive functioning skills to be challenged (critical thinking, flexibility, planning) because they need to figure out their priorities to survive. 

Scenarios were discussed, and they were prompted to think further - "how would you catch your fish?" or "how would you find food if you are not going to come out of your cave at all?" I loved reading the different answers! Simply adorable, what these kids come up with.
Creative writing
The older kids worked together to consolidate the various activities they have been doing by creating a pre-historic scene. Judging by the laughter coming from the rooms, they seemed to be having a great time with their new friends.
Our P1s
Our N2s created their own dinosaur world which they were all so proud of. Kate was the last to finish her work as she was so meticulous. Look at her serious face.
Their pre-historic world
They were taught the grid system, which is a typical way a fossil grid site is organized. This enables palaeontologists to record the horizontal and vertical positions of the excavated fossils and artifacts.

For children, grid work is important in developing their visual tracking skills, spatial orientation and perspective taking, all of which are important for the classroom and beyond. Most of all, they get all excited when they manage to dig up a bone!
Grid work
Parents were invited for the last 30 minutes on the last day to see what the kids had been up to, and it was a first for many parents to watch their kids do a show-and-tell. We had a lot of shy kids this round, and it was wonderful to see them have the courage to stand up there in front of so many parents, even though some of the N2s could only manage a whisper. Great effort, kids!

It was extremely heartening to see many dads come in during their lunch hour to be involved in their children's lives. The mums relegated the job of cracking the hardened eggs to the dads and you could see the glee on the kids' faces when the eggs finally broke!
Daddies in the house
We had such a great time with these little darlings and everyone was sad that the camp has come to an end.
Our graduating Palaeontologists
It has been an amazing few weeks working alongside my team of passionate teachers, with the common goal of making the camp enjoyable and meaningful for the kids. As exhausting as it was, seeing the kids have fun, open up, and learn so well over the 4 days is the reward in itself. Probably something only educators can relate to!
TLE team
1 camp down, 2 more to go. Our P1 Prep camp starts tomorrow and I'm certain the kids will have a swell time running their mini 'tuck shop' and learning strategies to get them ready for the big transition.

Our last camp for the year will be the Astronaut Training Camp from 13-16 December, and there are a few remaining slots for the morning session. Let your little ones join us for a unique space mission they will not forget!




The Little Executive
144 Bukit Timah Road
Singapore 229844
Tel: 69081889
Email: knockknock@thelittleexecutive.asia


~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~


Saturday, 26 November 2016

Do schools make the PSLE more stressful than it should be?

The 2016 PSLE results are out and something strange is happening. I'm still wondering why a parent's response to her own child's results was picked up by a newspaper, which has gone viral.

Our children, who have increasingly more access to the internet, are picking up on the views of us adults, and that is where they are forming their own opinions of self and success based partly on societal norms.

What should we be talking about, the days following the release of results?

The stories about resilience and students surmounting great obstacles are encouraging, and I would also love to read about the special programmes of various schools which might suit my child's interest and aid in our selection of a secondary school.

#4 had a rough ride this year and did not enjoy her PSLE year like her 3 older sisters did. They were up for the challenge, were motivated, supported well, and fought hard.

For her, the preparations and exams leading up to the PSLE were so daunting that she was overwhelmed. Even more of a pity is that despite the ridiculous amount of work piled on them, with hours of homework every day, there was no correlation to results.

As a parent, what do you do when you see your child cracking under the pressure? Push some more? For her sake or mine?

I shall not disclose her score as I did previously with my other girls as she was uncomfortable with me documenting her P6 year and I respect that.

Suffice to say that her results were as expected and I had already come to terms with that in June as she was not coping well and we had terminated all her tuition which we began in January. Her sanity was more important to me than those 3 digits.

However, what was unexpected was that several of her classmates had low scores too, despite them having a ton of tuition. I can't understand why parents are so caught up with top scorers and the percentage of students scoring above 250. Shouldn't we consider the weakest link in any situation? More so when there are GEP students making up the bulk of that percentage.

I only put her in this school after giving the school in our neighbourhood a shot with my 3 older kids and realizing that the values of the principal did not align with ours. On this note, I have to say that #4's principal is one of the best I have encountered and she was indeed lucky to have the opportunity to be in this school at this time. Her care and concern for each and every student was evident, and her greatest desire seemed to be to imbue in them solid values such as respect for others, service to the community, gratitude and humility.

I clarified with her teachers if she was in the lousiest class in the cohort, but no, I was told that it was a general mixed ability class. So that was quite puzzling. The hubs is disappointed that a seemingly good school is unable to prepare their students adequately for the national exams. It can't be that she is a very weak student because she managed to score an A for her English.

We did not scold her, for she must already be disappointed that she does not have many schools to choose from. We also could not say that as long as she had tried her best, that was enough, because honestly, I don't think she had given of her best in the run up to the exams.

Could we have done things differently? I do not know. Was it the pressure of the system that became too much for some of these 12-year olds to cope with? Likely so.

All I can do is to put things into perspective and tell her that the exams that needed to be taken were taken, and the results are out. This is definitely not the end, and life goes on. She has another opportunity to work hard and to do well and she should seize that chance.

Now it's off to consulting THE GREY HANDBOOK for the 4th time! It almost feels like an old friend.

One sad fact is that because her friends come from all over the island, from as far as Yishun, Pasir Panjang and even Sengkang, most of them are choosing a secondary school near their own home and the group of them will be separated.

That is her greatest worry now, to enter an unknown school, alone.

Whichever school she goes to, we can only hope and pray that she is lucky enough to get passionate teachers who will go the extra mile to teach and encourage them, and that she will find good friends to journey the next 4 years with.


~ www.mummyweeblog.com - a blog on parenting 6 kids in Singapore ~

Tuesday, 22 November 2016

Exciting Holiday Camps

School's out and things are heating up around here! Our team at The Little Executive is going full steam ahead to prepare for 3 weeks of holiday camps.

Join us for an exciting Dino Discovery Camp, where our mini paleontologists will have lots of hands-on opportunities to make their own fossils, do a Dino-dig, crack IQ codes, work together as a team to reconstruct a dinosaur skeleton and create a Dino cave! How cool is that?

Dino Discovery Camp - 4 days
Date: 29 November - 2 December 2016
Time: 9am - 12pm (N2, K1, K2)
2pm - 5pm (K1 - P2)
Fee: $400 per child
Holiday Camp
Our fun and interactive P1 Prep Camp will get your K2 child ready for a big new school! Entering Primary 1 is a very different experience from our time. The demands are much greater and kids today are less classroom ready.

Over the 4 days, we aim to equip them with our 5-Step Learning cycle to excel academically, a Growth Mindset to be unafraid of failure and become resilient students and Executive Functioning Skills which form the foundations of independent learning.

The kids will have fun running a mini 'tuck shop' and take turns buying and selling snack items while learning to handle money. They will also have ample opportunities to practice speaking up and communicating their needs.

More details of P1 Prep curriculum.

P1 Preparatory Camp
Date: 6-9 December 2016
Age: K2 only
Time: 2-5pm
Fee: $400 per child
P1 Prep Camp
Our popular Astronaut Training Camp is back this December holidays! Let us take your child on a unique mission to Outer Space where they will hone their problem-solving skills to complete Space Missions and enhance their teamwork and communication skills as they work together as a crew to build the ultimate space shuttle!

Many of our Astro cadets said it was the best holiday camp they have ever attended!

Astronaut Training Camp
Date: 13 - 16 December 2016
Age: K1 - P2
Time: 9am-12pm or 2-5pm
Fee: $400 per child
The Little Executive

  • 10% off camp fees with 2 or more sign ups
  • Parents are invited for the last 30 minutes on Friday for a presentation by our campers
  • Location: 144 Bukit Timah Road Singapore 229844 (5 min walk from KK Hospital)
  • Email: knockknock@thelittleexecutive.asia to register
  • Tel: 6908 1889
  • Website: www.thelittleexecutive.asia

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